Review: A Sickness in Time by M.F. Thomas, Nicholas Thurkettle

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A Sickness in Time by M.F. Thomas, Nicholas Thurkettle

In 2038, the human race is in a death spiral, and most people do not even know it yet. Technology that was supposed to make us better and stronger instead is birthing a strange and terrible plague we may not be able to stop. When the young daughter of Josh Scribner, a wealthy tech entrepreneur, starts to succumb to the illness, he dedicates his fortune in a desperate effort to save her life. Working with a friend & celebrated physicist, Josh develops the ability to send objects back through time. Their goal to recruit an agent in the past who might change our fatal path.

In our present day, a broken and traumatized Air Force veteran finds a strange message in the woods, drawing her into an adventure spanning decades. All humanity is at stake, as she and her small group of friends become the unlikely heroes taking up the secret fight against our future doom.

MF Thomas and Nicholas Thurkettle, authors of the acclaimed sci-fi thriller Seeing by Moonlight, are back with this time-twisting adventure that asks if our own destiny can be healed.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

A Sickness in Time on Goodreads


Review

Rating: 5 stars

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review*

Entrepreneur Josh Scribner has made a fortune from an idea that may well be the beginning of the end of the human race. In the year 2038, an older Josh is desperate to make things right and in the process save the life of his daughter. To do this, Josh develops a way to send messages back in time and he and a close friend and colleague embark on a daring mission to change the past.

In present day whilst on a camping trip, ex-air force pilot Maria Kerrigan finds a strange marker buried in the ground. It comes with instructions to deliver the marker to scientist Dr Qualls. Despite her misgivings, Maria’s curiosity gets the better of her and upon delivering the object she and her friend Lia become drawn into a battle to save the human race.

I really enjoyed reading A Sickness in Time. The science behind the plot was very well thought-out and completely believable. The approach was so methodical and plausible that you could easily believe that it might just work. The main characters were developed, flawed – but not so much that they were unlikeable – and very relatable. They all worked well together and their differences complimented each other nicely. However, the standout character for me was Lia. Here was a character who had been through so much and despite her difficulties was able to provide much needed support to Maria as well as becoming an integral part of the team.

A Sickness in Time is a compelling read that I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend and there is a nice twist to the end which I didn’t see coming!

Review: The Jakkattu Vector (Jakkattu #1) by P.K Tyler

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The Jakkattu Vector (Jakkattu #1) by P.K Tyler

They came as saviors to a deteriorating Earth.

Julip Thorne questions whether there is more to life beyond the barren dirt, acidic seas, and toxstorms her people work and die in. Living in poverty on the withering Greenland Human Reservation, she wonders if the alien Mezna goddesses are truly as holy as the temple preaches. Julip begins to dig deeper into the history of the planet and her leaders’ rise to power. But nothing can prepare her for the atrocities she uncovers.

Meanwhile, Jakkattu prisoner Sabaal suffers constant torture and heinous medical experiments as her Mezna-priest captors seek to unlock the key to her genetic makeup. Escaping from captivity, she finds herself suddenly alone on the hostile alien planet of Earth. To survive, she’s forced to work with the same Mezna-human hybrids she’s loathed her entire life, but the more they work together, the more they realize that their enemy is the same.

When humans and Mezna collide, will Sabaal turn out to be the genetic vector the Mezna have been searching for all along, or will she spark the flame that sets a revolution ablaze?

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

The Jakkatu Vector on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 3.5 stars

The Jakkattu Vector is the first novel in the Jakkattu series.

Julip Thorne is a young woman living in the Greenland Human Reservation. Her life seems to have been mapped out for her since birth as it is for all humans born in the Reservation. However, Julip is not content to accept the Mezna as gods and seeks to discover the truth, even at great cost.

For years Sabaal has endured torture at the hands of her god-like captors until one day she is able to escape her prison. On the run she finds unexpected allies in half-robot teks and mezna-human hybrids. Eventually she finds herself on Earth and must use all her survival skills to not only protect herself but also a new born baby.

This is a very well written novel and a good start to the series. There is plenty of action to straightaway draw the reader into the two different worlds. I loved Sabaal’s character from the start. She’s tough, does what is necessary yet there is a softer side to her that comes out as the novel progresses. Even after all she has been through with help from her allies she is still able to show compassion and empathy. Julip I found difficult to relate to although I think this had a lot to do with the dialogue in her parts. I found it hard to follow at times and so her sections of the novel were rather frustrating for me. I did persevere with it and the finale did not disappoint. I would definitely read book 2 but as I found it a bit of a struggle to follow in places I can only give it 3.5 stars.

Review: Concurrence by Marc Rokoff

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Concurrence by Marc Rokoff

Phillip has dedicated his life to achieving cross-time communication through the NOLTEX assembler. He only breaks away from his work once daily to visit Justin, his comatose boyfriend, in the local hospital. When a sudden breakthrough allows Phillip to talk with himself three months in the future, there’s plenty of reason to celebrate the success. He has single-handedly invented one of humanity’s greatest scientific achievements.

The celebration soon gives way to confusion when Phillip begins receiving strange messages from himself much further in the future. Adding to the intrigue is a curiously timed spatial anomaly that appears to be approaching Earth from a distant point in deep space. Is the timing of these two first-of-their-kind scientific events a coincidence? Or is there a connection between Phillip’s communications with the future and the approaching anomaly? When a shocking global event upends Phillip’s attempts to investigate, he suddenly finds himself alone to resolve the biggest crisis humanity has ever faced.

An exciting piece of science fiction literature, Concurrence is an engaging, quick read that’s fun yet thought-provoking. This mind-bending scifi book offers up a satisfying time travel adventure for genre fans and newbies alike.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Concurrence on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 4 stars

Phillip is a scientist who has dedicated his life to his work. His boyfriend Justin now lies in hospital in a coma and Phillip is convinced that his sudden breakthrough will help him to change the past and save Justin. His breakthrough allows him to communicate with his future self at various points in time, but then Phillip realises that there is much more to it than that. And when a global catastrophe occurs, Phillip realises that he is humanities only hope.

Concurrence is an engaging novella. Phillip is a well-rounded character, with imperfections that are relatable and sympathetic.  His closure and the end of the novella is bitter-sweet but filled with hope for the future. The author successfully blends science fiction and dystopia to create a very thrilling and enjoyable read.

Review: Lost Hunters, Second Edition by Deanne Devine

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Lost Hunters, Second Edition by Deanne Devine

“Amberly County would be a great place to live if it weren’t for this stupid curse.”
Jake Nichols, televised interview, “Peculiar People and Places.” WYOY TV, May 28, 1979.

The tale of John Barker’s Hunt has been handed down for generations in Amberly County. Stories about the Hunt are mostly told around campfires, but there are some who claim it to be true. According to the old timers, the county is cursed, and once every generation the ghost of John Barker returns to hunt down the person who killed him. Oddly enough, roughly every 20 years the county does suffer a cluster of bizarre deaths.

Nineteen years have passed since the last Hunt, but the citizens of the quiet town of Miltonville are too absorbed in their own problems to take notice. Cindy Swift is preoccupied with her upcoming suicide; Troy Ivers is worrying about the midnight ceremony he plans to hold in a rural cemetery; and Leslie Vickers is very concerned that the mannequin down the hall wants to kill her.

Ed Philips is the one person in Amberly County who is aware that trouble is about to arrive. It approaches in the form of a phantom, walking in the body of a dead man. Ed knows the real story behind the legend of the Hunt, but has spent most of his life denying the truth. Now, with the fate of a young woman in his hands, he must decide whether to continue feeding his demons of cowardice and regret, or face them head on, and attempt to put an end to John Barker’s Hunt.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Lost Hunters, Second Edition on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 2 stars

Amberly County’s residents have told the story of John Barker and his hunt for generations, each passing down the tale around campfires. But for some it isn’t just an old story but a real curse upon the county. And the strange deaths that occur every few decades do leave people wondering if there is some truth to the old tales.

I really wanted to enjoy this story. The synopsis was great and I was looking forward to a read full of suspense, fear and unexpected twists in the tale. To be honest I just found it very confusing. There were too many characters and none of them were very likable or stood out from the rest. There were times when I just wanted to give up as following the story was almost impossible. I persevered hoping that things would start to make more sense as the story progressed but this wasn’t the case. I ended the book feeling so disappointed. Deanne Devine is a good writer and has some great ideas, but there were too many characters and the constant switching of locations and between characters just created confusion. For me this was a disappointing and frustrating read.

Review: Marked by Stuart Park

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Marked by Stuart Park

Venus and her sister planet concludes their 3,000 year cycle. Stargazers amass to witness this once-in-a-lifetime event, but not Mark, his life is about to change.

Mark’s chance encounter with the cold but intangibly-carnal Kiko sets him plummeting into free-fall. Kim, his emphatic but emotionally-charged wife moonlights with a shadowy organisation whose intentions are far from transparent. She needs to blame someone for the disappearance of their daughter twenty years ago. No solace is offered by her egocentric therapist who’s engrossed in his own agenda.

Plagued by visions, Mark struggles to maintain his grip on reality and descends into a vividly-violent web of darkness. As Mark’s world spirals beyond his control, it’s quite possible this cycle will not end smoothly.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Marked on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 2 stars

Marked follows a family who are dealing with the unsolved disappearance of their daughter 20 years ago. As the story unfolds the planet Venus and her sister conclude a 3,000 year cycle and this is woven into the plot.

To be honest I didn’t really enjoy this book. It started off well, explaining the events that led to Mark and Kim’s daughter’s disappearance and then how they both dealt with the loss in their different ways. After this it seemed to get lost somehow. I found that the plot wasn’t really making sense and nor were the characters actions. I’m not too sure how the Venus cycle fitted in at all either. It was just too confusing and I ended up reading it twice to try and make sense of it all, but to no avail. Overall this made for a frustrating read so I can only give it 2 stars.

Review: Blade of the Destroyer (The Last Bucelarii #1) by Andy Peloquin

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Blade of the Destroyer (The Last Bucelarii #1) by Andy Peloquin

The Hunter of Voramis is the perfect assassin: ruthless, unrelenting, immortal. Haunted by lost memories, he is bonded to a cursed dagger that feeds him power but denies him peace of mind. Within him rages an unquenchable need for blood and death.
When he accepts a contract to avenge the stolen innocence of a girl, the Hunter becomes the prey. The death of a seemingly random target sends him hurtling toward destruction, yet could his path also lead to the truth of his buried past?

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Blade of the Destroyer on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 4 stars

Blade of the Destroyer is a dark fantasy novel set in the fictional city of Voramis. The assassin for hire known only as the Hunter knows nothing of his past and the secrets behind his ability to heal and longevity. His cursed blade known as Soulhunger hands down a fate worse than death to all those whose lives it takes. However, the Hunter isn’t as invulnerable as he seems and when a seemingly ordinary contract takes his path in a completely different direction, the Hunter discovers not only his missing past but strong enemies that seek to use it, and him, for their own purposes.

The world building in Blade of the Destroyer – complete with religion mythology – is excellent and provides the perfect setting for the story. The Hunter is a well-developed and complex character displaying a wide range of emotions – from cold, detached killer to showing compassion to those weaker than him – reminding the reader that underneath the façade he is just as human as the rest of the characters. I really enjoyed reading Blade of the Destroyer. The only thing I would say is I felt the finale dragged somewhat and took a little longer than was necessary.

Overall this is a very well-written, dark and gritty fantasy and is an excellent start to the series.

Review: Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop by John Brhel and Joseph Sullivan

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Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop

By John Brhel and Joseph Sullivan

Retired stage magician Dr. Marvelry prefers to stock his antique store with strange and occult items. He has always enjoyed meeting odd people and hearing their stories, the legends attached to mysterious objects. A phonograph that seemingly replays a tragedy. Fertility dolls that are more than decoration. A bedeviled mannequin. These are just some of the relics this eccentric shopkeeper has collected over the years.

No two customers will have the same experience in his curiosity shop — some walk away satisfied, others are never heard from again. But one thing is certain – when you purchase an item at this store, you often get more than what you paid for.

Follow Marvelry and his hexed objects through twelve tales of suspense, magic, terror, and transformation. Meet his new assistant, fellow illusionists, and some irregular characters along the way. Whatever macabre artifact of the human psyche you’re seeking – you’ll find something special in Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 5 stars

This novel is a collection of 12 short stories which centre around Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop which is a second hand store unlike no other – in that your purchase could kill you! The short stories are either unsuspecting customers dealing with the consequences of their purchases, being connected to a customer in some way or Marvelry’s own experiences.

This is very well thought-out and put together collection of tales. Short story telling is an art that the two authors have clearly mastered. Each tale was wonderfully imaginative and a fun read, with an unexpected twist at each end.

Marvelry himself was…well as curious as his shop! I couldn’t decide whether he knew just what the object he was selling could do or whether he really didn’t know at all. Either way, I found him to be rather likeable and endearing in a quaint old-fashioned way. I also liked that some of the stories were about Marvelry himself so I gained some more insight into the character.

Overall Marvelry’s Curiosity Shop is an excellent read and one that I recommend to lovers of short stories and spooky tales.