Review: A Sickness in Time by M.F. Thomas, Nicholas Thurkettle

31567399

A Sickness in Time by M.F. Thomas, Nicholas Thurkettle

In 2038, the human race is in a death spiral, and most people do not even know it yet. Technology that was supposed to make us better and stronger instead is birthing a strange and terrible plague we may not be able to stop. When the young daughter of Josh Scribner, a wealthy tech entrepreneur, starts to succumb to the illness, he dedicates his fortune in a desperate effort to save her life. Working with a friend & celebrated physicist, Josh develops the ability to send objects back through time. Their goal to recruit an agent in the past who might change our fatal path.

In our present day, a broken and traumatized Air Force veteran finds a strange message in the woods, drawing her into an adventure spanning decades. All humanity is at stake, as she and her small group of friends become the unlikely heroes taking up the secret fight against our future doom.

MF Thomas and Nicholas Thurkettle, authors of the acclaimed sci-fi thriller Seeing by Moonlight, are back with this time-twisting adventure that asks if our own destiny can be healed.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

A Sickness in Time on Goodreads


Review

Rating: 5 stars

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review*

Entrepreneur Josh Scribner has made a fortune from an idea that may well be the beginning of the end of the human race. In the year 2038, an older Josh is desperate to make things right and in the process save the life of his daughter. To do this, Josh develops a way to send messages back in time and he and a close friend and colleague embark on a daring mission to change the past.

In present day whilst on a camping trip, ex-air force pilot Maria Kerrigan finds a strange marker buried in the ground. It comes with instructions to deliver the marker to scientist Dr Qualls. Despite her misgivings, Maria’s curiosity gets the better of her and upon delivering the object she and her friend Lia become drawn into a battle to save the human race.

I really enjoyed reading A Sickness in Time. The science behind the plot was very well thought-out and completely believable. The approach was so methodical and plausible that you could easily believe that it might just work. The main characters were developed, flawed – but not so much that they were unlikeable – and very relatable. They all worked well together and their differences complimented each other nicely. However, the standout character for me was Lia. Here was a character who had been through so much and despite her difficulties was able to provide much needed support to Maria as well as becoming an integral part of the team.

A Sickness in Time is a compelling read that I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend and there is a nice twist to the end which I didn’t see coming!

Review: The Jakkattu Vector (Jakkattu #1) by P.K Tyler

31393528

The Jakkattu Vector (Jakkattu #1) by P.K Tyler

They came as saviors to a deteriorating Earth.

Julip Thorne questions whether there is more to life beyond the barren dirt, acidic seas, and toxstorms her people work and die in. Living in poverty on the withering Greenland Human Reservation, she wonders if the alien Mezna goddesses are truly as holy as the temple preaches. Julip begins to dig deeper into the history of the planet and her leaders’ rise to power. But nothing can prepare her for the atrocities she uncovers.

Meanwhile, Jakkattu prisoner Sabaal suffers constant torture and heinous medical experiments as her Mezna-priest captors seek to unlock the key to her genetic makeup. Escaping from captivity, she finds herself suddenly alone on the hostile alien planet of Earth. To survive, she’s forced to work with the same Mezna-human hybrids she’s loathed her entire life, but the more they work together, the more they realize that their enemy is the same.

When humans and Mezna collide, will Sabaal turn out to be the genetic vector the Mezna have been searching for all along, or will she spark the flame that sets a revolution ablaze?

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

The Jakkatu Vector on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 3.5 stars

The Jakkattu Vector is the first novel in the Jakkattu series.

Julip Thorne is a young woman living in the Greenland Human Reservation. Her life seems to have been mapped out for her since birth as it is for all humans born in the Reservation. However, Julip is not content to accept the Mezna as gods and seeks to discover the truth, even at great cost.

For years Sabaal has endured torture at the hands of her god-like captors until one day she is able to escape her prison. On the run she finds unexpected allies in half-robot teks and mezna-human hybrids. Eventually she finds herself on Earth and must use all her survival skills to not only protect herself but also a new born baby.

This is a very well written novel and a good start to the series. There is plenty of action to straightaway draw the reader into the two different worlds. I loved Sabaal’s character from the start. She’s tough, does what is necessary yet there is a softer side to her that comes out as the novel progresses. Even after all she has been through with help from her allies she is still able to show compassion and empathy. Julip I found difficult to relate to although I think this had a lot to do with the dialogue in her parts. I found it hard to follow at times and so her sections of the novel were rather frustrating for me. I did persevere with it and the finale did not disappoint. I would definitely read book 2 but as I found it a bit of a struggle to follow in places I can only give it 3.5 stars.

Review: The Heaviness of Knowing (The Conscious Dreamer Series #1)

30531269

The Heaviness of Knowing (The Conscious Dreamer Series Book #1)

by Sharolyn G Brown

You can’t unknow the truth.

Roxal has spent her life using her Dream Traveler ability in service to Trebor’s gods, The Keepers. Even after she learns they aren’t all powerful like she was taught, she dutifully continues to manipulate an Earth woman named Lauren to do their bidding. Roxal’s content pretending to be a loyal follower, until her mate’s activities with a rebel faction put both of their lives in jeopardy.

Meanwhile on Earth, Lauren is struggling to find balance at work and at home. To make matters worse, she develops an acute case of insomnia which disrupts her life. While trying to cure her condition, Lauren discovers that not only do aliens exist, but that she’s been in contact with one for most of her life. And that’s just for starters.

Now Lauren’s world is turned upside down. And Roxal has to figure out if she can harness the survival instincts which before told her to hide and use it to now fight for her survival.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

The Heaviness of Knowing on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 5 stars

The Heaviness of Knowing is the first novel in The Conscious Dreamer Series which centres around two main characters. The first, Roxal, is an alien from the planet Trebor who has spent her entire life serving Trebor’s Gods, the Keepers. Roxal is a traveller which means that her task is to connect with a human from Earth and assist her in creating technology that will aid Earth’s development and prevent it befalling the same fate as Trebor. However, Roxal soon learns that everything that she has been brought up to believe is a lie and with her mate, Edo and other resistors, they defy the Keepers and are branded as traitors.

Roxal’s human connection is a girl called Lauren who is under pressure from her Boss to finish the microchip that Roxal has been helping her with in her dreams. Due to their connection, Lauren develops life-threatening insomnia and when seeking help she learns the truth about the company she is working for, her childhood ‘imaginary’ friend Roxy and Trebor’s true intensions towards Earth.

The Heaviness of Knowing is a fantastic science fiction novel. The world-building is excellent, as are the main characters and I struggle to pick a favourite between the two of them. I had wondered if the switching between the two of them might be distracting but it’s certainly not the case at all as the changing perspectives are crucial to the story development and I really enjoyed getting to know the both of them better. There is just the right balance of action and the pace is steady, making this a real page turning. I was disappointed when it end and am really looking forward to reading book 2!

Review: Furnace

28675273

Furnace by Joseph Williams

On a routine escort mission to a human colony, Lieutenant Michael Chalmers is pulled out of hyper-sleep a month early. The RSA Rockne Hummel is well off course and—as the ship’s navigator—it’s up to him to figure out why. It’s supposed to be a simple fix, but when he attempts to identify their position in the known universe, nothing registers on his scans. Nothing at all. The vessel has catapulted beyond the reach of starlight by at least a hundred trillion light-years. Then a planetary-mass object materializes behind them. It’s burning brightly even without a star to heat it. Hundreds of damaged ships are locked in its orbit, but before the scanners go offline, the crew discovers there are no life-signs aboard any of them. As system failures sweep through the Hummel, neither Chalmers nor the pilot can prevent the vessel from crashing into the surface near a mysterious ancient city. And that’s where the real nightmare begins.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

Furnace of Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review *

Rating: 4 stars

When the ship RSA Rockne Hummel goes dramatically off-course, navigator Lieutenant Michael Chalmers is woken early from hyper-sleep to figure out why. Lost at the edge of space, they crash into the planet Furnace. And that’s where the horrors truly begin.

Furnace is told completely from Chalmers’ perspective as he fights for survival on a planet inhabited by demons. Whilst stranded on the planet’s surface the ship’s captain orders that Chalmers accompanies other crew members on a reconnaissance mission which goes terribly wrong. Knowing that there is no hope of rescue, Chalmers’ only chance of survival is to travel through an ancient demon city to reach his ship before it departs.

Furnace is a blend of science fiction, horror and a fast-paced thriller that never falters and keeps the reader gripped from the first page to the last. The main character is well-developed and his internal dialogue brings some dark humour to the situations that he finds himself in. I really enjoyed reading Furnace. The concept is very clever and unique, and the author successfully manages to bring together three genres in one great read.

Review: The Freezer (Genesis Endeavor Book 1) by David Kersten

The Freezer

The Freezer (Genesis Endeavor Book 1) by David Kersten

1966 has been a bad year for retired Army officer Jack Taggart. Still reeling from the tragic loss of his wife and daughter, a visit to his doctor reveals the worst possible news: cancer. Going in for surgery, he is uncertain if he can, or even should, face the fight for his life. When he wakes up to find over three hundred years have passed, an entirely new set of challenges lay before him – and a new reason to survive. Thrown into a scorched world he barely understands, Jack’s first battle will be to figure out where he is, how he got here, and how it all ties back to The Freezer, a 20th century underground military facility that could very well be the key to saving humankind.

Purchase Link: Amazon.com

The Freezer on Goodreads

Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review*

Rating: 5 Stars

The Freezer is the first book in the Genesis Endeavor series. Set over three hundred years in the future where humanity is on the edge of extinction, the survivors have turned to science to ensure the future of the human race.

The protagonist, Jack Taggart, is the oldest ‘reborn’ who has been brought back using advanced cloning techniques. His last memory is going into surgery for cancer in 1966 and when he awakes he is shocked to learn that hundreds of years have passed and that the citizens of New Hope need his help.

Jack is an extremely likeable character with a lot of depth and who develops further throughout the novel. His supporting cast are just as well thought out as is the future that Jack finds himself in. It is very clear that the author has put a lot of time and effort into thinking through and researching the science behind The Freezer and ensuring that it is entirely plausible. There is an excellent balance of action, world building and character development as well as some romance too!

The Freezer is one of the best books that I’ve read this year and I’m really looking forward to the next instalment in the series.

Review: Project Ark

Project Ark

Project Ark by L.T Gibbons

Fourteen year old Mia McAdams’ world is turned upside down when she finds herself torn from her life on Earth and transplanted onto the planet Usonia – a secret utopic world colonised after the second world war to safeguard the human race.

Submerged into this new reality, Mia quickly falls in love with the glittering planet and its alluring, other-worldly inhabitants. But when the future of Usonia comes under threat, it soon becomes clear that Mia holds the key to its survival.

Purchase Link: www.amazon.com

Project Ark on Goodreads


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review*

Rating: 3 Stars

Project Ark tells the story of Mia McAdams who is uprooted from her life on Earth to live on the secretly colonised planet Usonia. The novel shows how Mia adjusts to her new life and the very different way of living on the utopian-like planet.

I really liked the concept of Usonia, the whole new society and way of life, which is greatly different to that on Earth. There were amazing and very creative technological advancements. Project Ark high-lights environmental issues, and I like how it addresses them and also heightens the awareness of climate changes that we face today.

However, for me the pacing and the characterisation of Mia was disappointing. I felt as though it needed more chapters to expand on some areas. I would have liked to see more of Mia’s life before leaving for Usonia and also seen more of an interaction between her, her parents and best friend as I felt that her back-story and relationships were somewhat side-lined. The conflict later in the novel was brought to a rather rapid conclusion and I would have preferred this to play out for a bit longer.

I liked Mia’s character, but found myself wishing for a bit more depth to her. At times her swift adjustment to life on Usonia was frustrating. It felt as though she was now looking down on people from Earth and had forgotten that it wasn’t too long ago that she use to live there and be one of them. Perhaps Mia could have been used to bridge the gap that I felt existed between Usonia and Earth as there is lots that the two planets’ societies could have learned from each other.

Overall I did enjoy reading Project Ark. L .T Gibbons is very talented and has a great imagination. In my opinion it could have been longer and expanded on in some areas but this doesn’t detract from it being a good read.

Review: Kronos Duet by A.H. Richards

Kronos Duet

Kronos Duet by A.H. Richards

Psychic ‘astronaut’ Gareth Pugh and daughter Adrianna leap through time-space through the minds of others; dead others. Gareth’s mission, to reach the beginning of earth time, and confront God. He’s just not too good at getting there. Dead people can be unpredictably dangerous. Will they slingshot Gareth to God and the chance to undo a heinous murder? Can Adrianna protect him and fix their long-damaged relationship? Can she protect herself in alien psychic dimensions?
Brutal Dr. Buckleigh pursues them, missioned by the elitist Foundation to eliminate Pugh and Adrianna, and any evidence of God and time travel. His sadistic mercenary Cabot takes up the hunt, lustful to own Adrianna in a space/time of his choosing…
… But nobody factored in Rasputin, the hidden power of Stonehenge, or Black Holes.

Purchase Links: www.amazon.co.uk, www.amazon.com

Kronos Duet on www.goodreads.com.


Review

*I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review*

Rating: 5 Stars

Kronos Duet is a novel of great depth which explores the idea of time travel in a unique way; using the mind rather than any invention of mankind’s.

With the help of the plant Anis, Adrianna joins her father in traveling back in time in search of God, whilst attempting to heal the rift between them along the way.

Kronos Duet is an extremely well-written novel and one that should be read at least twice to fully appreciate the dark yet beautiful style and meaning in which it is written. This is not a light read, but it is an engaging one, which invokes so many questions and emotions as the novel progresses.

Kronos Duet is a brilliant novel which I thoroughly enjoyed and I look forward to reading more by A.H. Richards.